The wonderful weekend ends

img_8588When it come to the weather the weekend has been everything but wonderful. But it’s to be excepted towards the end of October. I’m always in denial about the climate I live in.

In most other respects it has been just that; time with loved ones, slow cooking,long dinners  and reading.

The weekend started early as I left work at three o’clock on Friday to go foraging for elderberries. There is a recipe in “The wonderful weekend book” by Elspeth Thompson that I’ve made before but I started out making one from a magazine this time;a plain elderberry syrup similar to the one by David Leibovitz that you can find here. Only forage if you know you are allowed AND KNOW WHAT IT IS YOU ARE GATHERING!! Elderberries must be cooked/boiled before consumption. The magazine suggested  using it for Gin&Tonics which we tried and it was nice(but next time I’m popping in a cinnamon stick in for autumn-vibes).

Then there has been sewing projects; two successful and a failure. I’m in a reading slump so did in fact start on Temeraire and spent  a lovely afternoon on the sofa with it, a magazine and big pot of tea.

Another thing that I’ve been doing in this cold and grey weather is showering by candlelight . Sadly there is no tub in this flat. It is something that I miss but I do try to make the most of what I  have. This trick did not come from the book(although is fully in line with it) but from Cup of Jo (here). I have also tried the eucalyptus thing  from the blogpost and it didn’t work at all. They just turned brittle very quickly. A nice scented candle is a much better bet.

Other things from the Autumn-chapter of Thompson’s book are; cashmere(Yaasss queen), baking bread (I make scones on the weekend;that’s as far as I’ll go), make hedgerow tipples (here in addition to the elderberry syrup) and lighting up the fireplace (don’t have one at home but do it plenty at the cottage).

This is a book I adore as you can tell. It’s all about “slow living” and has all these great tips and ideas on how to manage life. It’s because of this book that I now observe Lent, which is odd for an atheist but very character building: Often when I bring this book up someone mentions the sad death of Thompson herself. She committed suicide after battling depression for a long time. I feel for her family. Hopefully this book, full of joy, will be part of her legacy. I knew nothing about her death or her garden writing when I found this book in a second hand bookshop a few years ago. I do encourage you to keep your eyes out open for it. It’s wonderful companion for when the seasons change.

-Suss

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